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The panel discussion for Arts to Market on Wednesday quickly turned to a broad philosophical debate on the socio-economic and cultural fabric of the art market. The direction that the dialogue took was perturbing. It seemingly disturbed guest speaker and owner of Kerlin Gallery, Darragh Hogan, also. Hogan is an established art merchant hosting exhibitions from Kerlin Gallery on South Anne St, Dublin 2. He advocated for local, physical & social exchange as his core values and value proposition.

surfoclab retweet by Kerlin GalleryOthers sitting on the panel were Nicola Doran from the Design & Crafts Council of Ireland, Kate O’Daly of Love & Robots and Sean Moriarty of Demand Media and Saatchi Art. Moriarty extolled the virtues of art curation, a global community marketplace for artists, art lovers and buyers. The pillars of his argument were accessibility and self-promotion, the internet creating a level playing field and a canvas for the artist to tell their story, their purpose and creative process.

We couldn’t help but root for the underdog in this Darragh v Goliath debate. The smart money was all on Sean Moriarty’s argument. The way of the future points to digitisation, or at least phygital (funky applied example of content curation), e-commerce, community networks and peer review. The middle man would be redundant. No longer would the discerning gallery owner or distinguished art expert hold sway as to what art-work features or is deemed worthy…

We would! It’s hard to argue against the great democratisation of the internet and the unparalleled opportunity that it provides break-through artists to get their first break. But could the system be gamed?

We couldn’t help but root for the underdog in this Darragh v Goliath debate. The smart money was all on Sean Moriarty’s argument. The way of the future points to digitisation, or at least phygital (funky applied example of content curation), e-commerce, community networks and peer review. The middle man would be redundant. No longer would the discerning gallery owner or distinguished art expert hold sway as to what art-work features or is deemed worthy…

We would! It’s hard to argue against the great democratisation of the internet and the unparalleled opportunity that it provides break-through artists to get their first break. But could the system be gamed?

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MAINTENANCE VS. MANAGEMENT
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